Glory on Earth

Lyceum, Edinburgh
20th May-10th June
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Script: four-stars  Stagecraft: four-stars Performance: four-stars 

As spring and summer waltzes with flourish into the streets of Scotland’s capital, we are being given the wonderful opportunity to witness Linda Mclean’s adaption of the youthful adventures of Mary Queen of Scots. As a varied audience take its seats, the lone figure of John Knox (Jamie Sives) is standing clutching his bible, eagerly awaiting the arrival in Leith of Mary. With a moderate, but appealing, set design of chairs, arches and a central moving platform, the mood was set. Know was the only male actor, and his place amidst seven female roles was a fresh breath of theatrical air. Of these, Mary is of course the most important, & she is portrayed through different channels as her life is unveiled.

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The delicate subject of Queenship and Religion is smoothed over with injections of modern humor and chart- topping songs, allowing the audience the chance to revel in unexpected laughter. Meeting after meeting, the intensity of Mary and John Knox”s relationship is apparent. The tone strengthens, the words tighten and the facial expressions twist. The tension is clear to see and feel; emotional , intriguing, moving, with the dramatic reliefs paced expertly, the consummate creativeness of this play is more than obvious.

Flowing like a fast river with an imminent dam at the end, this hollowed friendship is cursed by belief and religion. The tale of Mary Queen of Scots is well known to be full of sadness and difficulties, but this particular plays conveys a lighter and more graceful queen. To take a historical part of Scottish history and tell it with a twist and splash of humor was entertaining and genius. A journey of true feelings and satisfaction engulfed the auditorium as Mary said goodbye. Well crafted, scripted and acted, this is a definite one to see this spring.

Reviewed by Raymondo Speedie

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Posted on May 25, 2017, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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